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Here's the question: Medication or Therapy: Which of these (or both) work best for you?

insertaname
Community Member

For me, ny answer is medication. I have been to psychologists (three) and all they give me are worksheets. I do not like worksheets, but i have applied some of their "i feel" techniques when speaking, but it somewhat feels ineffective. It is expensive even subsidized to fork out $70 per session. Personally talk is just talk to me, I want to see results. In addition, I carry a lot of baggage apart from my mental illness.

I used to talk my issues out to the psychiatrist about the medication - even if he didn't like it. I have an ok one for now, I am actually quite lucky he let stay at home to recover rather be hospitalised - high doses of meds. Although i struggle with my emotions at least they are not erratic. My relapse was a hypo one - small hiccup. I am still recovering. I am in tune with my bipolar and therapy just is not my thing at all despite the good advice. I'd rather walk the dog or do leisure activities.

I look forward to your responses - everyone's experiences will be different

Jennifer

2 Replies 2

Croix
Community Champion
Community Champion

Dear Jennifer~

I get the feeling you like starting thoughtful conversations -an excellent idea.

For you it looks like what you call talk does not work well, and meds are the big help. Everyone is different of course and respond differently to different things, plus of course there is the severity of their condition to take into account too.

For those who are fortunate enough to have milder conditions medication free on-line therapy like Mindspot Clinic's courses do get favorable comment.

For me there has always been meds, though I did not get the right sort, or treatment until I was really bad, suicidal in fact. There meds helped, but so did hospital, which was therapy of a sort I guess.

At the same time there was other therapy, which over the years has become more talk therapy than anything else, and is a stabilizing influence. I'd miss it if it was no longer there.

It took a long time for medications to be sorted out - now I have an excellent regimen that does the job with few side effects, however that is not the end of the story.

Even with these my sleep was terrible, a conditon that seemed to be permanent. True one could be 'knocked out' for a limited time with strong medication, however that is not practical. Reactions the following day, side effects plus developing tolerance are reasons it cannot continue.

Years ago I had hypnotherapy and was taught relaxation. I thought it a complete waste of time. The only time I was relaxed was when I was actually in the consultation room with the psychologist coaching me. When I went out the door there was no difference. I kept at it for a long time -no better.

Around 5 years ago I was put on a new drug, and found it enabled me to use the relaxation techniques I'd been taught so many years before. Bedtime was no longer something I dreaded, I could - very often - get quickly to sleep doing those exercise.

I've no idea if this is an answer to your question, perhaps I should say "Yes and No" (but don't quote me:)

Croix

romantic_thi3f
Community Champion
Community Champion

Hi Jennifer,

Thank you for your post and starting this discussion! I'm sorry to hear that therapy hasn't been helpful for you - my guess is that with all these worksheets they are all using the same modality or technique?

I think that with talk can come results; just depends on the conversation and the relationship with your therapist. Being able to see what's working for you, what's not working, underlying beliefs/messages, rewiring the way we think/feel/behave. Conversations can help us uncover deeper things about ourselves that can help give results.

It's probably a given that I'm a believer in therapy. I have too had my hits and misses with therapy. I take medication also, and have had hits and misses with those too. Overall, I find both is the best combination for me.

RT