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Beyond Blue Home Improvement Thread

geoff
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member
Hi everyone. I'm Geoff and have been a dedicated Volunteer on the forums for 13 years. I am proud to have stopped some of the stigmas that are associated with mental health as well as doing my best to help others too

Before my health went south I was a builder in all aspects of home construction and renovation. If you don't have a handyman around I hope I can offer you some tips that may be of help. I have had many years of experience in home renovation and will do my best to help you out if you are stuck and need some advice

I hope my experience may be of help to the people on Beyond Blue and make their life a little bit better. Even if you need help with the most basic painting job or putting up a shelf I can help there too with some tips

I will do my best to get back to anyone that has a question when I can as this is social yet important thread

Geoff
1,290 Replies 1,290

geoff
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member
hi Mathy, never use W4 to lubricate any lock, the reason why is because it's a liquid, so dust will stick to the lock, then cloak it up, only use graphite powder.
You can buy a small amount, it's cheap but it will also cover your hands when you use it, but wash off.
Rubber shovel, it's a classic isn't.
Great point Mathy about mentioning the 'mesh' it absolutely works, I've used it before, another way is to get a piece of (gyprock) plasterboard, you can pick some up from a building site will give you some FREE.
Next I'll tell you another way, and what I say makes it seem as though it will a long time, but no it won't, my description maybe long but when you get used to doing it this way, it takes only a couple of minutes.
Buy a small bag of cornice adhesive, Mathy will show you where it is, it has to be cornice, because it 'goes off quickly', in other words goes hard quicker.
Cut a piece that will go through the hole then put in the hole in the middle of it and then put a string through it and tie it to a nail or something similar.
Mix up a small amount of cornice adhesive and put on a piece of plaster, then pull the plaster towards you with the string, either hold it or tie it to something that won't move.
Leave it there for a couple of minutes, maybe 10 minutes or so, or even longer(long description isn't it, but I assure you it's quick), cut string and then cut another piece that will fit into hole, then put some cornice only a small amount and put into hole, then you can finish off.
Quite agree Mathy for a quick fix use the mesh, but if you're short of finances visit a building site, ask and they will give you everything.
Boy, well the mesh sounds to be much quicker, but if you're adventurous then have a go. Geoff.

white knight
Community Champion
Community Champion

Technical names

"plumb Bob"

Its a small heavy pointed object attached to a string.that is used with gravity to find a point directly down from bove.

Eg installing a flu for a wood heater. If you have the heater where you want it. You can hang the bob from the ceiling. Move the string around until the bob is in the centre of the hole in the heater. Where you hold the string, thats the centre of where your flue will penetrate the ceiling.

Ive actually never owned one. I use a large nail.

Flybrace

Inside a garage should be flybraces. They are attached on an angle between the roof and the top of the wall. They prevent the shed from distorting in high winds.

Dont leave them off! Ive seen a new, owner built shed completely destroyed as he left those braces off.

Attics I have one. Due to a previous house I knew what I could expect from one. Strictly they are storage areas. In Australia they are not considered "habitable rooms" unless they have walls higher than 1200mm. In your typical attic the roof meets the floor meaning the walls are 0mm. Legally a habitable room means you can use it as a bedroom or even lounge room. Otherwise a storeroom is all its meant for.

geoff
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member
hi Tony, that's what I did to install the wood, and yes if you don't have an attic then you've got a flat roof. Geoff.

blondguy
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member

Is really necessary to use a special expensive paint that is 'recommended' for bathrooms/toilets as per the paint manufacturer's directions?

I am currently using Dulux and previously had the builders specified paint 'Bergers' in my bathroom and toilets that lasted for 27 years until it just started peeling as per the moisture levels.

Is the super expensive paint worth it for the walls and ceilings of these areas or do I just use the Dulux I am now?

Thanks Geoff, Ballza, Mathy, RX, Tony WK

Paul

Mathy
Community Member

Hi Paul,

Are you talking about “Kitchen and Bathroom” paint, meaning it’s labelled that way? You pay more for that labelling lol. Also, they are often a semi gloss which personally I think is a nightmare in a kitchen/bathroom.

Those expensive paints have a mould inhibitor in them. Basically mould occurs due to poor ventilation.

You can buy a mould inhibitor to add to paint - if you do, wear PPE because it’s a bit toxic - you can certainly add this to your Dulux paint.

What I would do is clean your existing walls thoroughly with a decent mould remover (Selley’s Mould Remover or 30 Seconds brand), or alternatively 1 part White King or Domestos bleach (must be one of those brands) to 4 parts of water. When you clean, make sure you open windows and turn on the fan as the fumes are something else! What this does is kill the mould spores, which is essential. Clean and scrub thoroughly.

I’ve always used normal low sheen paint in a decently ventilated bathroom, and see no reason to use “special” paint in a kitchen, particularly if you have a range hood or exhaust fan.

What you pay for when you buy Dulux is one of the most (if not THE most) washable paints in Australia. It should be fine in your bathroom or kitchen, bestest, cheers Mathy 🙂

blondguy
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member

Thankyou Mathy for your help on this one....

I dont have any mould...just some flaking of ceiling paint after 27 years of the builders original paint...Bergers

After what you have said I will just stick with what I am using in my renovation...Dulux...without paying the silly extra money for their 'special' paint for bathrooms

I am taking your advice as per what you mentioned about the kitchen preparation and use a 180grit pole sanding pad on the ceiling to smooth over the odd area of flaking paint in the bathrooms

Is that okay?

Thanks Mathy 🙂

Paul

Mathy
Community Member

Hi Paul.

What you’re doing sounds excellent 👍 cheers M 🙂

blondguy
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member

Phew....I am glad and thankyou so much Mathy

(I wasnt kidding about the rubber shovel....seriously)

I am happy to learn though!

My Best as always

Paul

geoff
Blue Voices Member
Blue Voices Member
hi Mathy, good advice to Paul, you used to be able to buy a 20 ml bottle which contains mould inhibitor, not sure whether it's still available. Geoff.

Mathy
Community Member

Hi Geoff,

Yes you can still buy it. But as I said to Paul. The stuff is pretty toxic and should always be handled wearing appropriate PPE - which would be gloves and a mask.

If anyone wants mould inhibiting paint at a reasonable price and in whatever shine level you want, buy Taubmans - all of their indoor paint had mould inhibitor in it.

cheers M 🙂