Treatments, health professionals and therapies

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Athing Support group for doctor spouses?
  • replies: 6

Hi everyone I am looking for something fairly specific - a support group for spouses of medical doctors who are still in training to be specialists. I'm not sure if I'm posting in the right place. I know anecdotally there are people like me, but I ha... View more

Hi everyone I am looking for something fairly specific - a support group for spouses of medical doctors who are still in training to be specialists. I'm not sure if I'm posting in the right place. I know anecdotally there are people like me, but I haven't been able to find anything outside of the US with a Google/Facebook search. Long story short, the career pathway of a doctor doesn't just end with graduation - they need to choose a specialty (GP is also a specialty). Regardless of the specialty chosen, you need to pass exams to get onto a training pathway for a specialty, and once on the training pathway there are further exams and assessments. These are not run of the mill exams - they are gruelling and it is borderline sadistic that the medical profession expects doctors to work overtime days AND study for these exams. There is no guarantee that by passing exams you'll get on the training pathway you want -most specialties only have a very limited number of training spots per state. So realistically, this means moving interstate or rural if you even get a spot. All up, assuming you pass exams and get onto a training program (which are a yearly sitting/intake thing), it can take close to ten years to finish specialising. For some it's a never ending battle. It's also not acceptable to not specialise in something - you can't be in no-man's land training forever. I guess, I am posting this, because as the wife of a doctor, it's really hard. It's really hard to plan a family when you don't even know where you'll be in a year. It's hard to keep moving around - I'm in a new city again and it's very lonely here starting again. It's hard because I miss home, and the plan is to move back one day, but we don't know when one day actually is. He has unfortunately failed his exams despite so much hard work, which means another year for us here in this city we don't really like. He knows I miss home, even though I try to stay upbeat and positive, so I think he felt an extra sense of pressure to pass which backfired. For people not married to doctors, it's hard to understand the culture. People say 'just take some time off!' 'he needs to prioritise family more!' it's really not that simple. Like I said, I've anecdotally had chats with other women in the same situation who understood, but I wonder if there's a formal group out there?

hello_mae Confusion about treatment and support
  • replies: 3

I don't know if it's because of my DID/CPTSD neurodivergent brain or if it's genuinely confusing, but I don't know how to access more intensive support. I have a therapist through victims services who I talk to on the phone fortnightly and we do kind... View more

I don't know if it's because of my DID/CPTSD neurodivergent brain or if it's genuinely confusing, but I don't know how to access more intensive support. I have a therapist through victims services who I talk to on the phone fortnightly and we do kind of CBT and DBT based talk therapy about how I'm feeling and what's going on, and she's emailed Uniting to see about getting me a support worker (CLS program), but it's been months and they haven't even replied to her. From what I've researched tonight, going inpatient and being referred to other programs from there seems to be the main way of accessing that support, and the only way that is clearly outlined. But I'm deeply terrified about that thought, don't want to traumatise the children in my system, and feel sick at the idea of being both away from home and away from people I love and trust. Also even still, I don't know if I'm sick enough for that because I'm in like a limbo state of being able to unblend and observe symptoms, meet basic self-care needs most days, but that is all of my energy, and even still I don't have the energy to leave the house or even my bed for at least half of every month. So sorry, this probably makes no sense. I just don't understand at all how to do any of this.

GuestYD Voluntary Admission - What to expect
  • replies: 16

Hi all I have had quite a few private admissions at a specific clinic and thought I'd share some hints. Your GP can refer you to a clinic, but one of the psychiatrists with admitting rights must agree to take you on. Once you have a psychiatrist who ... View more

Hi all I have had quite a few private admissions at a specific clinic and thought I'd share some hints. Your GP can refer you to a clinic, but one of the psychiatrists with admitting rights must agree to take you on. Once you have a psychiatrist who can admit you, you will be contacted by intake at the hospital. They do a brief history and risk assessment and check how you plan to pay for the admission. Once you arrive at the hospital, you will be required to fill in a variety of forms (details, mood evaluation, fund forms, privacy). You are then met by your nurse who shows you to your room. They conduct a bags search, take medication and any items not allowed to be held onto by you. You are then interviewed by the nurse who does a history and asks why you have come in. You work on goals for your stay such as stabilising mood, attending groups, improving sleep etc they will also take your observations, such as temperature, blood pressure, height and weight. You then get a tour of the hospital. Important things to look for include coffee making facilities, lounges and which courtyard most patients congregate to. You then will see your psychiatrist who will work out a plan in terms of medication but they will also spend a bit of time getting to know what brings you in and makes a clinical assessment of condition and symptoms. After this day, you settle in and go to meals etc During the week there are group therapy classes run. These might be supportive therapy which is where everyone tries to help each other through their difficulties together, it might be a more formalised structure where you learn about the principles of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, learning about distress tolerance or it might be mindfulness. There are usually classes about what to do when you leave, so about outpatient programs and supports. My hospital also has sessions run by people with lived experience which is helpful advice. There is also an art room which is very busy with lots of materials. People can do whatever they like and some art produced is amazing. There will be some exercise groups like yoga and Pilates and if you have leave you can go with a group for a walk. Your psychiatrist will see you most weekdays and monitor your progress. They can refer you to psychologists and dietitians. Nurses will see you twice a day for a chat but also observe you on the ward. My biggest piece of advice is to chat to other patients. I've played uno before.

K_Ley treatment
  • replies: 1

Hi,I have connected with SANE Australia (early stages). Has anyone else received support through them, I am undergoing the guided support. Next step is the planning call. Is this a good service.

Hi,I have connected with SANE Australia (early stages). Has anyone else received support through them, I am undergoing the guided support. Next step is the planning call. Is this a good service.

Natalie22 Psychologist wants me to see psychiatrist for assessment
  • replies: 3

Hi I have been seeing a psychologist since February and he has recently raised that an assessment with a psychiatrist would be helpful for him.I can understand the merits but at the same time I am resisting mainly due to not being a bit fan of labels... View more

Hi I have been seeing a psychologist since February and he has recently raised that an assessment with a psychiatrist would be helpful for him.I can understand the merits but at the same time I am resisting mainly due to not being a bit fan of labels and also that I am scared.I am not really sure what path to take.

protracted44 Brisbane clinical medication specialist
  • replies: 2

Hi guys, Im having a lot of trouble with finding a specialist that understands withdrawal and medication sensitivity issues. Does anyone have any recommendations ? thanks heaps

Hi guys, Im having a lot of trouble with finding a specialist that understands withdrawal and medication sensitivity issues. Does anyone have any recommendations ? thanks heaps

K_Ley What is best
  • replies: 15

So, I am currently receiving online therapy for my condition. Whilst the therapist is great and we are getting on perfectly, I have to wonder if face to face therapy is better. This is my 2nd online therapist as I wanted to talk about my self-harming... View more

So, I am currently receiving online therapy for my condition. Whilst the therapist is great and we are getting on perfectly, I have to wonder if face to face therapy is better. This is my 2nd online therapist as I wanted to talk about my self-harming thoughts with the first one and they said they would be ending the sessions as it was not professional to keep going in that situation as they were not able to identify if something had triggered me. I get that, but because of it I have not told this therapist any of that information. Yes, I know I need to tell her, but I don't want to lose her and/or start all over again with a new therapist.

Athena__ Seeing a Psychologist Isn't Working
  • replies: 6

I have seen three different psychologists across my life. One when I was young (late primary school), another when I was in my early teens and just now another one. I can't say much for the earliest experience but with the other two I feel that I hav... View more

I have seen three different psychologists across my life. One when I was young (late primary school), another when I was in my early teens and just now another one. I can't say much for the earliest experience but with the other two I feel that I have achieved very little. The one I saw in my early teens and I would see each other very rarely (because of her schedule being very full), and so it felt that I was mostly discussing my life and any revelation we may have had was essentially forgotten by the time we saw each other a month or two later. There was no real treatment either? In the sense that it was mostly just talking about the present and how it made me feel rather than addressing issues. With my new therapist I was incredibly optimistic as we were going to be able to meet quite often and she was willing to address my issues and find solutions. However I feel that nothing has been achieved and I don't know if it's from a lack of effort on my part, or maybe there's nothing that needs to be fixed to begin with. She attempted to get me to 'visualize my anxiety' and see it sitting in a chair and talk to it. Then she attempted to get me to hit the chair with a pillow. It was incredibly uncomfortable and brought back a lot of year 7 trauma from drama class, like playing pretend. Then we attempted CBT but she very quickly moved to Schema Therapy. None of it has made any difference and I don't know what I'm doing wrong. She asks me questions and I just respond with 'I don't know' because I have an incredibly poor memory and she seems to be frustrated with my lack of answers. It feels like everything I do is futile, and anything that may be achieved in our sessions becomes essentially useless once I leave the room. I struggle a lot with articulating my thoughts as well, and it feels that sometimes she doesn't understand what I'm trying to say. I guess I'm not putting enough effort into my treatment, but I don't know what putting effort in would even look like. I'm becoming frustrated with my own lack of progress in therapy and within myself and I genuinely don't know what to do. I guess I'm wondering if anyone has any advice for what it is that I'm doing wrong, or for how to get the most out of seeing a psychologist? Thank you.

Daniel12 Anti-Depressant Withdrawal help
  • replies: 1

Hi there, I am Daniel, thanks in advance for taking the time to read this! I have been on anti-depressants now for 18 months and about 2-3 months ago I started the process of lowering my dosage to getting off the tablet.I first went down in dose, the... View more

Hi there, I am Daniel, thanks in advance for taking the time to read this! I have been on anti-depressants now for 18 months and about 2-3 months ago I started the process of lowering my dosage to getting off the tablet.I first went down in dose, then took the lower dose for a while and then staggered when I took the lowest dose (ie 1 every 2 days etc) as I built up the confidence without the tablet. I have now decided with the GP to stop taking the tablet as I have put in a power of work to get to where I am only thing that concerns me is I seem to be having withdrawals and a sudden mood drop & feel pretty anxious since I last took the tablet which was about 4 days ago which hasn't really happened before I have previously gone 3 days with no issue. I am concerned that I am going to suffer a relapse & it'll cancel out any of the work I have put in over the last 12-18months, Just wanted to see other peoples experiences and if they have felt similar and what they did? Thanks Daniel